Tire Repairers and Changers

Description

Repair and replace tires.

Tasks

  • Identify and inflate tires correctly for the size and ply.
  • Place wheels on balancing machines to determine counterweights required to balance wheels.
  • Raise vehicles, using hydraulic jacks.
  • Remount wheels onto vehicles.
  • Locate punctures in tubeless tires by visual inspection or by immersing inflated tires in water baths and observing air bubbles.
  • Unbolt wheels from vehicles and remove them, using lug wrenches and other hand and power tools.
  • Reassemble tires onto wheels.
  • Replace valve stems and remove puncturing objects.
  • Hammer required counterweights onto rims of wheels.
  • Rotate tires to different positions on vehicles, using hand tools.
  • Inspect tire casings for defects, such as holes or tears.
  • Seal punctures in tubeless tires by inserting adhesive material and expanding rubber plugs into punctures, using hand tools.
  • Glue tire patches over ruptures in tire casings, using rubber cement.
  • Assist mechanics and perform other duties as directed.
  • Separate tubed tires from wheels, using rubber mallets and metal bars or mechanical tire changers.
  • Patch tubes with adhesive rubber patches or seal rubber patches to tubes, using hot vulcanizing plates.
  • Inflate inner tubes and immerse them in water to locate leaks.
  • Clean sides of whitewall tires.
  • Apply rubber cement to buffed tire casings prior to vulcanization process.
  • Drive automobile or service trucks to industrial sites to provide services or respond to emergency calls.
  • Prepare rims and wheel drums for reassembly by scraping, grinding, or sandblasting.
  • Order replacements for tires or tubes.
  • Roll new rubber treads, known as camelbacks, over tire casings, and mold the semi-raw rubber treads onto the buffed casings.
  • Buff defective areas of inner tubes, using scrapers.
  • Place casing-camelback assemblies in tire molds for the vulcanization process and exert pressure on the camelbacks to ensure good adhesion.

Skills

Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Auto Tire Worker
Automotive Mechanic (Auto Mechanic)
Automotive Technician (Auto Technician)
General Service Technician (GST)
Service Technician
Technician
Tire Balancer
Tire Buster
Tire Changer
Tire Fixer
Tire Groover
Tire Installer
Tire Man
Tire Mechanic
Tire Mounter
Tire Repairer
Tire Servicer
Tire Shop Mechanic
Tire Technician
Tire Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$11.25 hourly, $23,410 annual.
Employment (2008):
96,880 employees