Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers

Description

Install, set-up, rearrange, or remove switching, distribution, routing, and dialing equipment used in central offices or headends. Service or repair telephone, cable television, Internet, and other communications equipment on customers' property. May install communications equipment or communications wiring in buildings.

Tasks

  • Note differences in wire and cable colors so that work can be performed correctly.
  • Test circuits and components of malfunctioning telecommunications equipment to isolate sources of malfunctions, using test meters, circuit diagrams, polarity probes, and other hand tools.
  • Test repaired, newly installed, or updated equipment to ensure that it functions properly and conforms to specifications, using test equipment and observation.
  • Drive crew trucks to and from work areas.
  • Inspect equipment on a regular basis in order to ensure proper functioning.
  • Repair or replace faulty equipment such as defective and damaged telephones, wires, switching system components, and associated equipment.
  • Remove and remake connections in order to change circuit layouts, following work orders or diagrams.
  • Demonstrate equipment to customers and explain how it is to be used, and respond to any inquiries or complaints.
  • Analyze test readings, computer printouts, and trouble reports to determine equipment repair needs and required repair methods.
  • Adjust or modify equipment to enhance equipment performance or to respond to customer requests.
  • Request support from technical service centers when on-site procedures fail to solve installation or maintenance problems.
  • Remove loose wires and other debris after work is completed.
  • Assemble and install communication equipment such as data and telephone communication lines, wiring, switching equipment, wiring frames, power apparatus, computer systems, and networks.
  • Communicate with bases, using telephones or two-way radios to receive instructions or technical advice, or to report equipment status.
  • Collaborate with other workers in order to locate and correct malfunctions.
  • Review manufacturer's instructions, manuals, technical specifications, building permits, and ordinances in order to determine communication equipment requirements and procedures.
  • Test connections to ensure that power supplies are adequate and that communications links function.
  • Climb poles and ladders, use truck-mounted booms, and enter areas such as manholes and cable vaults, in order to install, maintain, or inspect equipment.
  • Refer to manufacturers' manuals to obtain maintenance instructions pertaining to specific malfunctions.
  • Designate cables available for use.
  • Run wires between components and to outside cable systems, connecting them to wires from telephone poles or underground cable accesses.
  • Remove and replace plug-in circuit equipment.
  • Route and connect cables and lines to switches, switchboard equipment, and distributing frames, using wire-wrap guns or soldering irons to connect wires to terminals.
  • Clean and maintain tools, test equipment, and motor vehicles.
  • Program computerized switches and switchboards to provide requested features.
  • Diagnose and correct problems from remote locations, using special switchboards to find the sources of problems.
  • Maintain computer and manual records pertaining to facilities and equipment.
  • Install updated software, and programs that maintain existing software and/or provide requested features such as time-correlated call routing.
  • Enter codes needed to correct electronic switching system programming.
  • Perform database verifications, using computers.
  • Address special issues or situations, such as illegal or unauthorized use of equipment, or cases of electrical or acoustic shock.
  • Examine telephone transmission facilities to determine requirements for new or additional telephone services.
  • Determine viability of sites through observation, and discuss site locations and construction requirements with customers.
  • Perform routine maintenance on equipment, including adjusting and lubricating components, and painting worn or exposed areas.
  • Measure distances from landmarks to identify exact installation sites for equipment.
  • Clean switches and replace contact points, using vacuum hoses, solvents, and hand tools.
  • Dig holes or trenches as necessary for equipment installation and access.
  • Install telephone station equipment, such as intercommunication systems, transmitters, receivers, relays, and ringers, and related apparatus, such as coin collectors, telephone booths, and switching-key equipment.
  • Provide input into the design and manufacturing of new equipment.
  • Place intercept circuits on terminals to handle vacant lines in central office installations.

Knowledge

Sociology and Anthropology
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
Therapy and Counseling
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
Philosophy and Theology
Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Antenna Installer
Assigner
Automatic Equipment Technician
Broadband Technician
Cable Television Installer (Cable TV Installer)
Cable Television Line Technician
Cable Television Technician (CATV Technician)
Call Box Wirer
Call Circuit Worker
Central Office Equipment Installer
Central Office Frame Wirer
Central Office Mechanic
Central Office Repairer
Central Office Technician
Central Office Trouble Shooter
Central Office Worker (CO Worker)
Combination Technician
Communication Equipment Mechanic
Communication Equipment Repairer
Communications Equipment Installer
Communications Equipment Repair Technician
Communications Technician
Community Antenna Television Line Technician
Customer Service Technician (CST)
Data Communications Technician
Desk Worker
DSL Technician (Digital Subscriber Line Technician)
Electronic Systems Technician (EST)
Electronics Mechanic
Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
Equipment Installer
Equipment Mechanic
Equipment Tester
Erector
Exchange Mechanic
Exchange Trouble Shooter
Facility Examiner
Facility Technician
Facility Worker
Field Services Technician
Field Technician
Framer
Information Transport Systems Technician
Inside Wirer
Install / Repair Technician
Installer
Installer Apprentice
Installer Electronics
Instrument Adjuster
Instrument Installer
Instrument Mechanic
Instrument Repairer
Instrument Setter
Interior Block Wirer
Manual Equipment Mechanic
Mother (Matrix) Repairer
Network Cable Installer
Network Specialist
Office Electrician
Outside Plant Technician
PBX Installer (Private Branch Exchange Installer)
PBX Mechanic (Private Branch Exchange Mechanic)
PBX Repairer (Private Branch Exchange Repairer)
PBX Wire Chief (Private Branch Exchange Wire Chief)
Plant and Equipment Worker (P&E Worker)
Plant and Maintenance Technician
Plant Technician
Power Technician
Public Address Servicer
Relay Adjuster
Relay Mechanic
Remote Terminal Installer
Repairer, Shop, Instrument
Rigger
Satellite Communications Antenna Installer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$26.22 hourly, $54,530 annual.
Employment (2008):
208,220 employees