Medical Equipment Repairers

Description

Test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

Tasks

  • Test or calibrate components or equipment, following manufacturers' manuals and troubleshooting techniques, using hand tools, power tools, or measuring devices.
  • Keep records of maintenance, repair, and required updates of equipment.
  • Inspect and test malfunctioning medical or related equipment, following manufacturers' specifications and using test and analysis instruments.
  • Disassemble malfunctioning equipment and remove, repair, or replace defective parts, such as motors, clutches, or transformers.
  • Perform preventive maintenance or service, such as cleaning, lubricating, or adjusting equipment.
  • Test, evaluate, and classify excess or in-use medical equipment and determine serviceability, condition, and disposition, in accordance with regulations.
  • Examine medical equipment or facility's structural environment and check for proper use of equipment to protect patients and staff from electrical or mechanical hazards and to ensure compliance with safety regulations.
  • Study technical manuals or attend training sessions provided by equipment manufacturers to maintain current knowledge.
  • Solder loose connections, using soldering iron.
  • Explain or demonstrate correct operation or preventive maintenance of medical equipment to personnel.
  • Evaluate technical specifications to identify equipment or systems best suited for intended use and possible purchase, based on specifications, user needs, or technical requirements.
  • Plan and carry out work assignments, using blueprints, schematic drawings, technical manuals, wiring diagrams, or liquid or air flow sheets, following prescribed regulations, directives, or other instructions as required.
  • Research catalogs or repair part lists to locate sources for repair parts, requisitioning parts and recording their receipt.
  • Contribute expertise to develop medical maintenance standard operating procedures.
  • Fabricate, dress down, or substitute parts or major new items to modify equipment to meet unique operational or research needs, working from job orders, sketches, modification orders, samples, or discussions with operating officials.
  • Repair shop equipment, metal furniture, or hospital equipment, including welding broken parts or replacing missing parts, or bring item into local shop for major repairs.
  • Compute power and space requirements for installing medical, dental, or related equipment and install units to manufacturers' specifications.
  • Make computations relating to load requirements of wiring or equipment, using algebraic expressions and standard formulas.
  • Supervise or advise subordinate personnel.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Bio Medical Technician
Biomedical Electronics Technician
Biomedical Engineering Technician (BMET)
Biomedical Equipment Specialist
Biomedical Equipment Technician (BMET)
Certified Biomedical Equipment Technician (CBET)
Cryogenics Repairer
Dental Equipment Installer and Servicer
Dental Equipment Mechanic
Durable Medical Equipment Technician (DME Tech)
Electric Brain Wave Equipment Mechanic
Electromedical Equipment Repairer
Field Service Technician
Hearing Aid Mechanic
Hearing Aid Repairer
Hearing Aid Technician
Radiological Equipment Specialist
Radiology Service Engineer
Surgical Instrument Mechanic

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$21.43 hourly, $44,570 annual.
Employment (2008):
35,740 employees