Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Commercial and Industrial Equipment

Description

Repair, test, adjust, or install electronic equipment, such as industrial controls, transmitters, and antennas.

Tasks

  • Test faulty equipment to diagnose malfunctions, using test equipment or software, and applying knowledge of the functional operation of electronic units and systems.
  • Inspect components of industrial equipment for accurate assembly and installation or for defects, such as loose connections or frayed wires.
  • Install repaired equipment in various settings, such as industrial or military establishments.
  • Examine work orders and converse with equipment operators to detect equipment problems and to ascertain whether mechanical or human errors contributed to the problems.
  • Perform scheduled preventive maintenance tasks, such as checking, cleaning, or repairing equipment, to detect and prevent problems.
  • Study blueprints, schematics, manuals, or other specifications to determine installation procedures.
  • Set up and test industrial equipment to ensure that it functions properly.
  • Repair or adjust equipment, machines, or defective components, replacing worn parts, such as gaskets or seals in watertight electrical equipment.
  • Maintain equipment logs that record performance problems, repairs, calibrations, or tests.
  • Calibrate testing instruments and installed or repaired equipment to prescribed specifications.
  • Develop or modify industrial electronic devices, circuits, or equipment, according to available specifications.
  • Coordinate efforts with other workers involved in installing or maintaining equipment or components.
  • Operate equipment to demonstrate proper use or to analyze malfunctions.
  • Consult with customers, supervisors, or engineers to plan layout of equipment or to resolve problems in system operation or maintenance.
  • Enter information into computer to copy program or to draw, modify, or store schematics, applying knowledge of software package used.
  • Advise management regarding customer satisfaction, product performance, or suggestions for product improvements.
  • Determine feasibility of using standardized equipment or develop specifications for equipment required to perform additional functions.
  • Send defective units to the manufacturer or to a specialized repair shop for repair.
  • Maintain inventory of spare parts.
  • Sign overhaul documents for equipment replaced or repaired.

Knowledge

Geography
Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

Lay Titles

Aerial Erector
Aerial Installer
Amplifier Mechanic
Automation Mechanic
Automation Technician
Avionics Technician
Boardman
Certified Control Systems Technician
Computerized Environmental Control Installer
Control Equipment Electrician
Control Systems Technician
Control Technician
Electrical and Instrument Technician (E&I Tech)
Electrical Assistant
Electrical Repairman
Electrician
Electrician Technician
Electronic Equipment Repairmen
Electronic Mechanic
Electronic Sales and Service Technician
Electronics Mechanic
Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
Field Service Engineer
Hydro Maintenance Technician
Hydro Plant Technician
I&C Tech (Instrument and Control Technician)
Industrial and Control Technician
Industrial Electrician
Instrument and Electrical Technician (I&E Tech)
Instrument Technician
Locksmith
Mechatronics Technician
Meteorological Equipment Repairer
Metrology Technician
Microwave Technician
Missile Pad Mechanic
Plant and Maintenance Technician
Plant Electrician
Printed Circuit Board Reworker
Radar Mechanic
Radar Repair and Installation Technician
Radar Technician
Radio Antenna Installer
Radio Interference Expert
Radio Interference Investigator
Radioactivity Instrument Maintenance Technician
Robot Technician
Robotics Mechanic
Robotics Technician
SCADA Technician (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Technician)
Semiconductor Wafers Probe Test Card Repairer
Service Technician
Technical Support Specialist

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$25.31 hourly, $52,650 annual.
Employment (2008):
66,440 employees