Camera and Photographic Equipment Repairers

Description

Repair and adjust cameras and photographic equipment, including commercial video and motion picture camera equipment.

Tasks

  • Calibrate and verify accuracy of light meters, shutter diaphragm operation, or lens carriers, using timing instruments.
  • Disassemble equipment to gain access to defect, using hand tools.
  • Adjust cameras, photographic mechanisms, or equipment such as range and view finders, shutters, light meters, or lens systems, using hand tools.
  • Clean and lubricate cameras and polish camera lenses, using cleaning materials and work aids.
  • Measure parts to verify specified dimensions or settings, such as camera shutter speed or light meter reading accuracy, using measuring instruments.
  • Test equipment performance, focus of lens system, diaphragm alignment, lens mounts, or film transport, using precision gauges.
  • Examine cameras, equipment, processed film, or laboratory reports to diagnose malfunction, using work aids and specifications.
  • Requisition parts or materials.
  • Read and interpret engineering drawings, diagrams, instructions, or specifications to determine needed repairs, fabrication method, and operation sequence.
  • Fabricate or modify defective electronic, electrical, or mechanical components, using bench lathe, milling machine, shaper, grinder, or precision hand tools, according to specifications.
  • Assemble aircraft cameras, still or motion picture cameras, photographic equipment, or frames, using diagrams, blueprints, bench machines, hand tools, or power tools.
  • Install film in aircraft camera and electrical assemblies and wiring in camera housing, following blueprints and using hand tools and soldering equipment.
  • Record test data and document fabrication techniques on reports.
  • Lay out reference points and dimensions on parts or metal stock to be machined, using precision measuring instruments.
  • Recommend design changes or upgrades of microfilming, film-developing, or photographic equipment.

Knowledge

Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.

Skills

Instructing
Teaching others how to do something.

Abilities

Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.

Work Activities

Staffing Organizational Units
Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Aircraft Photographic Equipment Mechanic
Camera Machinist
Camera Mechanic
Camera Repair Technician
Camera Repairman
Camera Technician
Computerized Photofinishing Equipment Service Technician
Field Service Engineer
Motion Picture Equipment Machinist
Photo Equipment Technician
Photo Technologist
Photographic Equipment Maintenance Technician
Photographic Equipment Mechanic
Photographic Equipment Repair Technician
Photographic Equipment Technician
Photographic Technician (Photo Tech)
Repair Cameraman
Repair Technician
Repairman
Technician
Video Technician

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$18.26 hourly, $37,980 annual.
Employment (2008):
2,590 employees